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BAGHDAD (AP) — The leader of Lebanon’s Iranian-backed Hezbollah group says the liberation of the Iraqi city of Mosul is a “historic opportunity” that should be seized upon to uproot extremist groups in the region.

In a televised speech Tuesday night, Hassan Nasrallah likened the Islamic State group to a “cancerous” growth that may return at any time, saying it must not be allowed to regroup.

Eradicating this “criminal group” by its roots should remain a priority even after the liberation of Mosul, Nasrallah said.

He congratulated the government and people of Iraq and described the liberation as a “great victory and achievement.”

Iraq’s Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi declared “total victory” in Mosul on Monday, after a nearly nine-month-long battle with IS fighters.

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BEIJING (AP) — China on Tuesday said it shouldn’t be held responsible alone for solving the North Korean nuclear standoff, and accused other countries of shirking their responsibilities in the effort to reduce tensions.

The complaints, made in unusually strident language, follow a phone conversation between President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump earlier this month in which the Chinese leader warned of “some negative factors” that were harming China-U.S. relations, indicating relations between the two countries had hit a rough patch after some initial optimism.

Foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters Tuesday that China was upholding its obligations under United Nations resolutions on North Korea, while other countries were fanning the crisis while damaging China’s interests by their actions.

“China is not to be blamed for the current escalation of tension, nor does China hold the key to resolve the issue,” Geng said at a daily news briefing.

“If China is striving to put out the fire, while the others are fueling the flame … how can China’s efforts achieve expected outcomes? How can the tension be eased? How can the Korean Peninsula nuclear issue be resolved?” Geng said.

Saying some unidentified parties were circulating the “China responsibility theory,” Geng said they were operating with “ulterior motivations” and sought to shrug off their own responsibilities.

“Absolving oneself of responsibility is not OK. Tearing down bridges after crossing the river is not OK. Stabbing in the back is even less OK,” Geng said.

China is North Korea’s only major diplomatic ally and economic partner, and the U.S. and others have called on Beijing to use whatever leverage it has to pressure North Korea into curbing nuclear tests and missile launches that violate U.N. sanctions.

However, China says perceptions of its influence with North Korea are exaggerated. It also refuses to take measures that might destabilize North Korea’s hard-line communist regime and lead to violence, massive flows of refugees into China, and the possibility of a united Korea allied with the United States.

Beijing complained after one of its banks was recently cut off from the U.S. financial system for allegedly helping North Korea launder money, saying other countries’ laws shouldn’t extend to Chinese entities.

It also bitterly opposes South Korea’s deployment of a sophisticated U.S. missile defense system that Beijing says jeopardizes Chinese security because of an ability to monitor missile launches and other military activities within northeastern China.

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MOSUL, Iraq (AP) — Sporadic clashes erupted in Mosul on Tuesday, a day after Iraq’s prime minister declared “total victory” over the Islamic State group, with several airstrikes hitting the Old City neighborhood that was the scene of the fierce battle’s final days.

Plumes of smoke rose into the air as IS mortar shells landed near Iraqi positions and heavy gunfire could be heard on the western edge of the Old City.

At times heavy, the clashes underscored the dangers still posed by the militants after Iraqi forces announced they retook full control of Mosul, the country’s second-largest city, three years after it was seized by extremists bent on building a global caliphate.

Meanwhile, Amnesty International warned in a report released Tuesday that the conflict in Mosul has created a “civilian catastrophe,” with the extremists carrying out forced displacement, summary killings and using civilians as human shields.

The report also detailed violations by Iraqi forces and the U.S.-led coalition.

“The scale and gravity of the loss of civilian lives during the military operation to retake Mosul must immediately be publicly acknowledged at the highest levels of government in Iraq and states that are part of the U.S.-led coalition,” said Lynn Maalouf, the research director for Mideast at Amnesty.

The report, which covers the first five months of this year, noted how IS fighters moved civilians with them around the city, preventing them from escaping, creating battle spaces with dense civilian populations while “Iraqi forces and the U.S.-led coalition failed to adapt their tactics.”

The Iraqi forces and the U.S.-led coalition “continued to use imprecise, explosive weapons with wide area effects in densely populated urban environments,” Amnesty stated, adding that some violations may constitute war crimes.

On Monday evening, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi came to Mosul for the second day in a row to declare “total victory,” flanked by his senior military leadership at a small base on the edge of the Old City. But he also alluded to the brutality of the conflict, saying the triumph had been achieved “by the blood of our martyrs.”

In Geneva, the U.N. human rights chief urged Iraq’s government to ensure that human rights will be respected in post-IS Mosul.

Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein described Mosul’s fall as the “turning point” in the conflict against IS, but warned the group continues to subject people to “daily horrors” in its remaining strongholds of Tal Afar, west of Mosul, and Hawijah, north of Baghdad.

“Horrific though the crimes of ISIL are, there is no place for vengeance,” said Zeid, who is a Jordanian prince, using an alternative acronym for the Islamic State group.

He cited allegations of threats of collective punishment and forced evictions in Mosul by Iraqi security forces and their allies. He also cited three years of rights violations during IS’ control of Mosul, including abuses like sexual slavery of women and girls that “have left deep scars on Iraqi society.”

In Baghdad, Shiite politician Karim al-Nouri warned that defeating IS in Mosul doesn’t mean that “terrorism” is finished and urged the government to review its policies for dealing with Sunni areas of the country to “avoid previous mistakes that led to the emergence” of IS.

The government needs to work on “removing fears of marginalization and terrorism affiliation in Sunni areas,” said al-Nouri, a senior member of Badr Organization. He said he believes the Iraqi security forces should stay in Mosul until it is fully secure, before handing over to local forces.

Lawmaker Intisar al-Jabouri from Nineveh province, where Mosul is the capital, said that uprooting IS’ “extremism ideology” was key for a peaceful future in Mosul, which reeled under the extremists’ harsh rule for three years.

She urged Baghdad to invest in “good relations” between the residents and the security forces and take all “necessary measures to prevent terrorism groups from returning to Mosul.”

While Mosul fell to the Islamic State group in a matter of days in 2014, the campaign to retake the city, which began last October, has lasted nearly nine months.

For more than two years before the operation started, Iraqi forces backed by coalition airstrikes slowly clawed back territory from IS elsewhere in Iraq, and tens of thousands of Iraqi troops went through a massive coalition training program.

The IS defeat in Mosul dealt a huge blow to the group’s so-called Islamic “caliphate” — territory that the militants seized, spanning large swaths of both Iraq and Syria — but also killed thousands, left entire neighborhoods in ruins and displaced nearly 900,000 from their homes.

Thousands of civilians are estimated to have been killed in the fight for the city, according to the provincial council of Nineveh, where Mosul is the capital — a toll that does not include those still believed buried under collapsed buildings.

Iraq’s military does not release official casualty numbers for soldiers killed in combat.

A statement late Monday from IS claimed its fighters were still attacking Iraqi soldiers in the al-Maydan area of Mosul’s Old City, purportedly killing and wounding many and seizing weapons and ammunition.

“The soldiers of the caliphate in Mosul continue to accomplish epics until they achieve either victory or martyrdom,” it said.

Also Monday, the United Nations said that of the more than 897,000 people displaced from Mosul, thousands will probably not be able to return because of “extensive damage caused during the conflict.”

“Make no mistake, this victory alone does not eliminate ISIS, and there’s still a tough fight ahead,” Lt. Gen. Stephen Townsend, the top U.S. commander in Iraq said in a recorded video from Baghdad following al-Abadi’s statement. ISIS is another acronym for IS, also referred to as Daesh, an Arabic name.

“The coalition will continue to support our Iraqi partners until ISIS is defeated in Iraq,” Townsend added, calling on Iraqis to unite and prevent a return of the conditions that allowed the extremists’ rise more than three years ago.

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MOSUL, Iraq (AP) — Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi declared victory Monday evening over the Islamic State in Mosul after nearly nine months of grueling combat to drive the militants out of Iraq’s second-largest city.

“We announce the total victory for Iraq and all Iraqis,” al-Abadi said, speaking from a small base in western Mosul on the edge of the Old City, where the last pockets of resistance had been holding out.

“This great feast day crowned the victories of the fighters and the Iraqis for the past three years,” he said.

Hours earlier, airstrikes pounded the last IS-held territory on the western edge of the Tigris River. In recent days, Iraqi troops, closely backed by airstrikes from the U.S.-led coalition, confined the remaining few hundred extremists in an area measuring less than a square kilometer (less than a mile).

Shortly after al-Abadi’s speech, the coalition congratulated him on the victory against “a brutal and evil enemy,” according to a statement.

“While there are still areas of the Old City of Mosul that must be back-cleared of explosive devices and possible ISIS fighters in hiding, the ISF have Mosul now firmly under their control,” the statement added.

Al-Abadi was in Mosul on Sunday, congratulating Iraqi soldiers on recent gains but stopping short of declaring an outright victory.

The battle for Mosul was Iraq’s longest and most punishing conventional fight against IS in the more than three-year war against the extremists.

Launched in October, the massive operation comprised more than 70,000 Iraqi troops drawn from the country’s army, special forces, police, tribal fighters and mostly Shiite paramilitary forces.

Over the course of the campaign, Iraq’s special forces units who largely led the assault have faced casualty rates of 40 percent, according to a report in May from the office of the U.S. secretary of defense.

Additionally, thousands of civilians were estimated to have been killed, according to Nineveh’s provincial council. That did not include those still believed buried under collapsed buildings.

The fight also displaced more than 897,000 people, and the United Nations said there was no end in sight to the humanitarian crisis in Iraq despite the conclusion of the fight.

The U.N. said thousands of Mosul residents will likely remain displaced from the city after the fight is concluded because of “extensive damage caused during the conflict.”

The battle also has decimated Mosul’s infrastructure in its western half, where fighting was fiercest. Iraq’s civil defense rescue teams — a branch of the Interior Ministry — said about 65 percent of the buildings in the Old City, many dating back centuries, were severely damaged or destroyed. In western neighborhoods like Zanjili, destruction was estimated to be 70 percent of all houses, buildings and infrastructure.

Mosul fell to IS militants within a matter of days in June 2014, starting a political and security crisis not seen in the country since the 2003 toppling of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein.

The territorial gains by the extremists led to the ouster of Iraq’s top leaders, dramatically shifted the balance of power among its security forces, empowered Iranian-backed fighters who are now sanctioned by the central government, and brought U.S. ground troops back onto Iraqi soil for the first time since 2011.

The road to retake Mosul has taken the government, its security forces and the coalition more than three years of training troops to replace the tens of thousands of Iraqi forces who dissolved in the face of the 2014 IS advance.

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BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Parliament on Monday set itself on a collision course with Britain, making a damning assessment of British proposals on EU citizens’ rights after the U.K. leaves the European Union.

The legislature indicated it would be using its power of veto on the negotiations if Britain did not become more lenient on the rights of EU citizens living in the country, a further indication of how tough the two-year negotiations are expected to become.

In a letter Monday to EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier, the group said EU citizens in Britain would be looking at “nothing less than relegation to second-class status,” adding that the U.K. proposals made on June 26 do not “respect the principles of reciprocity, symmetry and non-discrimination.”

Citizens’ rights in each other’s nations are considered the first issue that both sides must settle.

“It is clear we will not approve any deal which diminishes the rights of EU citizens in the U.K. or U.K. citizens in the EU,” Guy Verhofstadt, the EU Parliament’s chief Brexit official, told the AP.

Even though Barnier is leading the negotiations for the EU as a whole, the European Parliament still has a veto right on any deal. So Verhofstadt’s words carry power and should boost the standing of Barnier when he meets with his British counterpart David Davis next week.

British Prime Minister Theresa May had first floated her ideas on protecting the rights of each other’s citizens at an EU summit in late June. The U.K. proposal offers EU nationals who have lived in Britain for at least five years — as of an unspecified cut-off date — “settled status,” with the right to live, work and access benefits. The estimated 3 million EU nationals in Britain would all have to apply individually for permission to stay, and it’s unclear what the plan would mean for those who have been in the U.K. for a shorter time.

The other EU leaders were halfhearted at best about what May called a “generous” offer on protecting the rights of EU citizens.

After carefully studying the details, the EU Parliament’s Brexit Steering Group was much more definitive and said too much of Britain’s optimistic talk was just a smoke screen. It indicated it wouldn’t be good enough for the legislature.

“The rights of EU citizens in the U.K. will be reduced to a level lower than third country nationals in the EU,” the letter to Barnier said.

“The aspirational language used in relation to rights as important as the right to health or the recognition of diploma and professional qualifications does not provide the much-needed guarantees.”

“Above all,” the four-page letter brimming with scathing comments added, EU citizens in Britain would have “no life-long protection.”

The EU parliament wants citizens from both sides to receive “fair treatment” and their rights “given full priority in the negotiations.”

Alongside citizens’ rights, the Brexit negotiators will first have to address the substantial bill that Britain will have to pay to quit the EU and the problems surrounding the border in Ireland.

The withdrawal process of Britain from the EU should be completed by March 2019, meaning negotiators only have up to the fall of 2018 to agree, not only on the disentanglement of the country but also on setting up a new relationship.

The EU has said once there is “sufficient” progress on such withdrawal issues as the rights of citizens, it could start talks simultaneously on a new relationship and a trade deal.

The difficulties already surrounding the first issue indicate that it could become a tough job.

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GENEVA (AP) — The U.N.’s envoy for Syria on Monday opened a new round of indirect talks, the seventh so far, between Syrian government representatives and opposition leaders to try to wind down the battered country’s civil war.

The start of the talks in Geneva coincided with the first full day of a cease-fire for southern Syria that was brokered last week by the United States, Russia and Jordan.

Opposition activist Ahmad al-Masalmeh said it was quiet in the city of Daraa, near the Jordanian border. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights monitoring group reported light shelling and bombardment in the city overnight.

The agreed-on cease-fire covers three war-torn provinces in southern Syria. It’s the first tangible outcome following months of strategy and diplomacy between the new Trump administration and Russian President Vladimir Putin’s Moscow.

The Geneva talks are expected to last through the week. U.N. envoy Staffan de Mistura declined to comment on his expectations but was due to hold a news conference later in the day.

De Mistura will be shuttling between the two sides, which have so far only faced each other in ceremonial meetings that have been short on substance. The U.N. envoy was first to meet with representatives from Syrian President Bashar Assad’s government on Monday, before a meeting later with opposition representatives.

The U.N.-led diplomatic efforts seek partly to ensure humanitarian aid deliveries to Syria and plan for the day after the war is over.

The Syrian opposition is determined to achieve a political transition in Damascus, while Assad’s government insists the talks should prioritize “the war on terror.” Deputy Special Envoy Ramzy Ramzy said in Damascus on Saturday the talks would address both matters in parallel.

Meanwhile, Syrian government forces retook the al-Hail gas field in central Syria from Islamic State militants, the army reported. The government and its Iranian backers have been advancing through the country’s Homs province to secure vital resources they lost early in the war. Their declared aim is to relieve Syrian soldiers who have been under IS siege in the city of Deir El-Zour, a regional hub for resource commerce.

Oil and Mineral Resources Minister Ali Ghanem said Syria was producing 10 million cubic meters (13.08 million cubic yards) of gas a day — roughly half of its pre-war output of 21 million cubic meters a day.

In northern Syria, at least one person was killed and several others wounded in a barrage of rocket fire and shelling on areas under the control of a U.S.-backed Syrian Kurdish militia. The People’s Protection Units blamed the attack on Turkey. Ankara says the militia is an extension of an outlawed Kurdish insurgent group operating inside its own borders. At least three civilians were killed in shelling on Kurdish villages last week.

Five people were killed in shelling on the nearby city of Aleppo, Syrian state media reported. The government blamed it on rebels encamped outside the city.

Separately, the al-Qaida-linked Levant Liberation Committee group said on social media it detained 123 IS fighters in northwest Idlib province, a rebel-held corner of the country where the group is largely in control. The Observatory also reported the detentions on Sunday.

Assad’s government has refused to entertain talk of the president’s departure. He inherited power from his father, the late Hafez Assad, in 2000 and has held on despite the devastating civil war. Half of the country’s population has been displaced, and some 400,000 people have been killed in the violence since 2011.

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BERLIN (AP) — Germany’s justice minister called Monday for better exchange of information on violent extremists in the European Union following the riots that accompanied the Group of 20 summit.

Hamburg saw three nights of violence amid anti-globalization protests as leaders of the world’s biggest economic powers met. Police arrested 186 and temporarily detained a further 225 people.

“The brutal riot tourists stop at no borders,” Justice Minister Heiko Maas said. “A high proportion of the violent extremists traveled to the G-20 from other European countries.”

He added that “we experienced a new quality of violence, which we should react to with more cooperation in combating extremists.”

Germany temporarily reintroduced border controls with its European neighbors weeks before the summit.

Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere said “several hundred” known extremists were turned back. Other people were searched but in some cases there was no legal reason to deny them entry, such as traveling with weapons like slingshots.

“We are talking about a year and half to two years of preparation in the left-wing extremist scene,” de Maiziere said. “I wouldn’t be surprised if much of the material with which police officers were wounded came to Germany long before border controls were introduced.”

“The events surrounding the G-20 summit must be a turning point in our view of the left-wing scene’s readiness to use violence,” he added. There must be “no tolerated retreats” in German cities for violent far-left extremists, he said.

De Maiziere is a member of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservative party. Maas belongs to the center-left Social Democrats, its current partners in a national governing coalition of traditional rivals.

Hamburg’s city government, which oversaw the police operation, is led by the Social Democrats. The local branch of Merkel’s party has called for Mayor Olaf Scholz’s resignation, but Merkel’s chief of staff Peter Altmaier — also a conservative — rejected that call. Germany holds a national election Sept. 24.

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UNITED NATIONS (AP) — More than 120 countries approved the first-ever treaty to ban nuclear weapons Friday at a U.N. meeting boycotted by all nuclear-armed nations.

To loud applause, Elayne Whyte Gomez, president of the U.N. conference that has been negotiating the legally binding treaty, announced the results of the “historic” vote — 122 nations in favor, the Netherlands opposed, and Singapore abstaining.

“We have managed to sow the first seeds of a world free of nuclear weapons,” Whyte Gomez said. “We (are) … saying to our children that, yes, it is possible to inherit a world free from nuclear weapons.”

“The world has been waiting for this legal norm for 70 years,” since atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 at the end of World War II, she said.

Setsuko Thurlow, who was a 13-year-old student in Hiroshima when a U.S. nuclear bomb destroyed the city, said survivors “have worked all our lives to make sure that no other human beings should ever again be subjected to such an atrocity.”

None of the nine countries known or believed to possess nuclear weapons — the United States, Russia, Britain, China, France, India, Pakistan, North Korea and Israel — is supporting the treaty. Many of their allies also did not attend the meeting.

In a joint statement, the U.N. ambassadors from the United States, Britain and France said their countries don’t intend to ever become party to the treaty.

They said it “clearly disregards the realities of the international security environment” and “is incompatible with the policy of nuclear deterrence, which has been essential to keeping the peace in Europe and North Asia for over 70 years.”

The treaty offers no solution to “the grave threat posed by North Korea’s nuclear program, nor does it address other security challenges that make nuclear deterrence necessary,” the three ambassadors said.

A ban that doesn’t address these concerns “cannot result in the elimination of a single nuclear weapon and will not enhance any country’s security,” they said. “It will do the exact opposite by creating even more divisions at a time when the world needs to remain united in the face of growing threats.”

The U.S., Britain and France along with other nuclear powers instead want to strengthen the nearly half-century-old Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, considered the cornerstone of global nonproliferation efforts.

That pact sought to prevent the spread of atomic arms beyond the five original weapons powers — the U.S., Russia, Britain, France and China. It requires non-nuclear signatory nations to not pursue atomic weapons in exchange for a commitment by the five powers to move toward nuclear disarmament and to guarantee non-nuclear states’ access to peaceful nuclear technology for producing energy.

All NATO members boycotted the treaty negotiations except for the Netherlands, which has U.S. nuclear weapons on its territory and was urged by its parliament to send a delegation

The Netherlands deputy U.N. ambassador Lise Gregoire-Van-Haaren told delegates her country couldn’t vote for a treaty that went against its NATO obligations, had inadequate verification provisions or that undermined the NPT — and “this draft does not meet our criteria.”

Whyte Gomez, Costa Rica’s U.N. ambassador in Geneva, said 129 nations signed up to help draft the treaty, which represents two-thirds of the 193 member states.

The treaty will be opened for signatures in September and come into force when 50 countries have ratified it, she said, and its language leaves the door open for nuclear weapon states to become parties to the agreement.

The treaty requires of all ratifying countries “never under any circumstances to develop, test, produce, manufacture, otherwise acquire, possess or stockpile nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices.”

It also bans any transfer or use of nuclear weapons or nuclear explosive devices — and the threat to use such weapons.

Iran, which signed an agreement with six major powers in 2015 to rein in its nuclear program, was among the countries that voted for the treaty.

Other countries that voted in favor include Sweden, Switzerland, Austria, Brazil, South Africa, Egypt, Iraq, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Indonesia and the Philippines.

Rebecca Johnson of the London-based Institute for Disarmament Diplomacy who spent the past decade helping to develop strategy for a treaty, called the vote “the first step to prevent a handful of militaries holding the world hostage with their nuclear arsenals.”

“We will use (the ban) to stop further nukes being made, used or deployed,” she said.

North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile tests, including its July 3 launch, have become a timely argument for proponents and opponents of the treaty to ban atomic weapons.

Beatrice Fihn, executive director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, said 15,000 nuclear weapons around the world have not deterred Pyongyang’s nuclear ambitions and a new approach is needed, starting with prohibition as a first step.

U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley said on March 27 when talks began on the treaty that “there is nothing I want more for my family than a world with no nuclear weapons, but we have to be realistic.”

She asked whether anyone thought North Korea would give up its nuclear weapons, arguing that Pyongyang would be “cheering” a nuclear ban treaty and Americans and others would be at risk.

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HAMBURG, Germany (AP) — Talks on global trade at the Group of 20 summit proved very difficult and differences on climate change also were clear, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Friday, as police and protesters clashed throughout the day in the summit’s host city of Hamburg.

Merkel told leaders of the G-20 economic powers that they must be prepared to make compromises as she worked toward a summit outcome that everyone present could accept.

That is a challenging task at a time when President Donald Trump’s Trump’s “America First” rhetoric and decision last month to withdraw from the Paris accord against climate change have caused widespread concern.

Negotiators “still have a great deal of work ahead of them” to formulate a passage on trade in the summit’s closing communique, Merkel said after the first day of meetings.

She added that most participants called for “free but also fair trade” and underlined the significance of the World Trade Organization, though she didn’t specify which ones did not support the trade language.

“The discussions are very difficult, I don’t want to talk around that,” Merkel said.

The German leader said most summit participants backed the Paris climate accord. Speaking separately, French President Emmanuel Macron spoke of “the common engagement which we must take, we must defend, at a moment when it is called in question by certain people.”

“It will be very interesting to see how we formulate the communique tomorrow and make clear that, of course, there are different opinions in this area because the United States of America regrettably … wants to withdraw from the Paris accord,” Merkel said.

Germany has been keen to preserve the G-20’s tradition of making decisions by consensus. Merkel has rejected calls from some to push for a strong “G-19” statement — without the U.S. — on climate change.

Opening discussions earlier in the day, Merkel told fellow leaders that there are “millions of people following us with their concerns, their fears and their needs, who hope that we can make a contribution to solving the problems.”

“We all know the big global challenges, and we know that time is pressing,” she said. “So solutions can only be found if we are prepared to compromise … without, and I say this clearly, bending ourselves too much out of shape. We can of course also name differences.”

The leaders did make a joint statement on fighting terrorism, an issue on which there are few differences. They called for ensuring that there are “no ‘safe spaces’ for terrorist financing anywhere in the world” and pledged to work with internet providers and app administrators to combat the web’s use for terror propaganda and financing.

Merkel noted that the countries at the summit represent two-thirds of the world’s population, four-fifths of the globe’s gross domestic product and three-quarters of world trade.

The G-20 comprises Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, Germany, France, Britain, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Canada, South Korea, Mexico, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Turkey, the United States and the European Union.

Also attending are the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Guinea, Senegal, Singapore and Vietnam.

Merkel said the threat posed by North Korea’s missile tests was brought up at Friday’s meetings by the leaders of South Korea and other countries in the region, and all hoped that “the U.N. Security Council will find an appropriate answer” to Pyongyang’s violation of U.N. resolutions.

The summit was also a forum for a flurry of bilateral meetings, including Trump’s first encounter with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Outside the security cordon around the downtown congress center, anti-globalization activists set dozens of cars ablaze and tried unsuccessfully to block national delegations from entering the summit.

The city already had boosted its police with reinforcements from around the country and had 20,000 officers on hand to patrol Hamburg’s streets, skies and waterways. Another 900 were called in to cope with the clashes.

Merkel thanked them for their work.

“I have every understanding for peaceful demonstrations,” she said. “But violent demonstrations endanger human lives, they endanger people themselves, they put police officers and security forces in danger, put residents in danger, and so that is unacceptable.”

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HAMBURG, Germany (AP) — German Chancellor Angela Merkel told leaders of the Group of 20 economic powers Friday that millions of people are hoping they can help solve the world’s problems, and warned them that they must be prepared to make compromises.

As the leaders discussed terrorism, trade and climate change, protests against their gathering continued in various parts of Hamburg. Anti-globalization activists set dozens of cars ablaze and protesters tried unsuccessfully to block leaders’ delegations from getting to the downtown convention center where the summit is being held.

Police ordered in several hundred more officers from across the country on Friday.

Inside the security cordon, Merkel’s prospects of finding common ground issues such as climate change and multilateral trade looked uncertain at President Donald Trump’s first G-20 summit. Trump’s “America First” rhetoric and decision to withdraw from the Paris accord against climate change have caused widespread concern in Europe and beyond.

“There are of course millions of people following us with their concerns, their fears and their needs, who hope that we can make a contribution to solving the problems,” Merkel told fellow leaders at the start of a working lunch at which they were to discuss global growth and trade.

“I am absolutely sure that everyone will make an effort to achieve good results,” she added.

“We all know the big global challenges, and we know that time is pressing,” Merkel said. “So solutions can only be found if we are prepared to compromise … without, and I say this clearly, bending ourselves too much out of shape. We can of course also name differences.”

Merkel noted that the countries at the summit represent two-thirds of the world population, four-fifths of the globe’s gross domestic product and three-quarters of world trade.

The G-20 comprises Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, Germany, France, Britain, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Canada, South Korea, Mexico, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Turkey, the United States and the European Union.

Also attending the summit are the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Guinea, Senegal, Singapore and Vietnam.

Before the summit, the leaders of China, India, Russia, Brazil and South Africa met and called for a more open global economy.

In a statement following their meeting, the so-called BRICS nations voiced support for a “rules-based, transparent, non-discriminatory, open and inclusive multilateral trading system” and emphasized the need for increasing “the voice and representation” of emerging markets and developing countries in global economic and financial institutions.

Speaking at the meeting, Russian President Vladimir Putin spoke against global trade restrictions, saying that financial sanctions on a political pretext hurt mutual confidence and damage the global economy — an apparent reference to Western sanctions against Russia.

The BRICS leaders also urged the international community to work jointly to implement the Paris climate agreement.

The summit, at which Trump was holding his first meeting with Putin, follows skirmishes Thursday evening between police and protesters at a demonstration in Germany’s second-biggest city that was expected to be the largest flashpoint around the summit.

Police said that at least 111 officers were hurt during those clashes, one of whom had to be taken to a hospital with an eye injury after a firework exploded in front of him. Twenty-nine people were arrested and another 15 temporarily detained.

On Friday, there were further incidents but nothing as intense as Thursday’s skirmishes.

Dozens of officers built moving lines in different parts of Hamburg and used water cannons to force away protesters from streets across the city. Some were physically moved for hundreds of meters (yards) from a protest sit-in in front of the first security checkpoint near the summit grounds.

None of the activists managed to push into the no-go zone around the summit that the police had established.

The city has boosted its police with reinforcements from around the country and has 20,000 officers on hand to patrol Hamburg’s streets, skies and waterways.

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