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UNITED NATIONS (AP) — More than 120 countries approved the first-ever treaty to ban nuclear weapons Friday at a U.N. meeting boycotted by all nuclear-armed nations.

To loud applause, Elayne Whyte Gomez, president of the U.N. conference that has been negotiating the legally binding treaty, announced the results of the “historic” vote — 122 nations in favor, the Netherlands opposed, and Singapore abstaining.

“We have managed to sow the first seeds of a world free of nuclear weapons,” Whyte Gomez said. “We (are) … saying to our children that, yes, it is possible to inherit a world free from nuclear weapons.”

“The world has been waiting for this legal norm for 70 years,” since atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 at the end of World War II, she said.

Setsuko Thurlow, who was a 13-year-old student in Hiroshima when a U.S. nuclear bomb destroyed the city, said survivors “have worked all our lives to make sure that no other human beings should ever again be subjected to such an atrocity.”

None of the nine countries known or believed to possess nuclear weapons — the United States, Russia, Britain, China, France, India, Pakistan, North Korea and Israel — is supporting the treaty. Many of their allies also did not attend the meeting.

In a joint statement, the U.N. ambassadors from the United States, Britain and France said their countries don’t intend to ever become party to the treaty.

They said it “clearly disregards the realities of the international security environment” and “is incompatible with the policy of nuclear deterrence, which has been essential to keeping the peace in Europe and North Asia for over 70 years.”

The treaty offers no solution to “the grave threat posed by North Korea’s nuclear program, nor does it address other security challenges that make nuclear deterrence necessary,” the three ambassadors said.

A ban that doesn’t address these concerns “cannot result in the elimination of a single nuclear weapon and will not enhance any country’s security,” they said. “It will do the exact opposite by creating even more divisions at a time when the world needs to remain united in the face of growing threats.”

The U.S., Britain and France along with other nuclear powers instead want to strengthen the nearly half-century-old Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, considered the cornerstone of global nonproliferation efforts.

That pact sought to prevent the spread of atomic arms beyond the five original weapons powers — the U.S., Russia, Britain, France and China. It requires non-nuclear signatory nations to not pursue atomic weapons in exchange for a commitment by the five powers to move toward nuclear disarmament and to guarantee non-nuclear states’ access to peaceful nuclear technology for producing energy.

All NATO members boycotted the treaty negotiations except for the Netherlands, which has U.S. nuclear weapons on its territory and was urged by its parliament to send a delegation

The Netherlands deputy U.N. ambassador Lise Gregoire-Van-Haaren told delegates her country couldn’t vote for a treaty that went against its NATO obligations, had inadequate verification provisions or that undermined the NPT — and “this draft does not meet our criteria.”

Whyte Gomez, Costa Rica’s U.N. ambassador in Geneva, said 129 nations signed up to help draft the treaty, which represents two-thirds of the 193 member states.

The treaty will be opened for signatures in September and come into force when 50 countries have ratified it, she said, and its language leaves the door open for nuclear weapon states to become parties to the agreement.

The treaty requires of all ratifying countries “never under any circumstances to develop, test, produce, manufacture, otherwise acquire, possess or stockpile nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices.”

It also bans any transfer or use of nuclear weapons or nuclear explosive devices — and the threat to use such weapons.

Iran, which signed an agreement with six major powers in 2015 to rein in its nuclear program, was among the countries that voted for the treaty.

Other countries that voted in favor include Sweden, Switzerland, Austria, Brazil, South Africa, Egypt, Iraq, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Indonesia and the Philippines.

Rebecca Johnson of the London-based Institute for Disarmament Diplomacy who spent the past decade helping to develop strategy for a treaty, called the vote “the first step to prevent a handful of militaries holding the world hostage with their nuclear arsenals.”

“We will use (the ban) to stop further nukes being made, used or deployed,” she said.

North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile tests, including its July 3 launch, have become a timely argument for proponents and opponents of the treaty to ban atomic weapons.

Beatrice Fihn, executive director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, said 15,000 nuclear weapons around the world have not deterred Pyongyang’s nuclear ambitions and a new approach is needed, starting with prohibition as a first step.

U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley said on March 27 when talks began on the treaty that “there is nothing I want more for my family than a world with no nuclear weapons, but we have to be realistic.”

She asked whether anyone thought North Korea would give up its nuclear weapons, arguing that Pyongyang would be “cheering” a nuclear ban treaty and Americans and others would be at risk.

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HAMBURG, Germany (AP) — Talks on global trade at the Group of 20 summit proved very difficult and differences on climate change also were clear, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Friday, as police and protesters clashed throughout the day in the summit’s host city of Hamburg.

Merkel told leaders of the G-20 economic powers that they must be prepared to make compromises as she worked toward a summit outcome that everyone present could accept.

That is a challenging task at a time when President Donald Trump’s Trump’s “America First” rhetoric and decision last month to withdraw from the Paris accord against climate change have caused widespread concern.

Negotiators “still have a great deal of work ahead of them” to formulate a passage on trade in the summit’s closing communique, Merkel said after the first day of meetings.

She added that most participants called for “free but also fair trade” and underlined the significance of the World Trade Organization, though she didn’t specify which ones did not support the trade language.

“The discussions are very difficult, I don’t want to talk around that,” Merkel said.

The German leader said most summit participants backed the Paris climate accord. Speaking separately, French President Emmanuel Macron spoke of “the common engagement which we must take, we must defend, at a moment when it is called in question by certain people.”

“It will be very interesting to see how we formulate the communique tomorrow and make clear that, of course, there are different opinions in this area because the United States of America regrettably … wants to withdraw from the Paris accord,” Merkel said.

Germany has been keen to preserve the G-20’s tradition of making decisions by consensus. Merkel has rejected calls from some to push for a strong “G-19” statement — without the U.S. — on climate change.

Opening discussions earlier in the day, Merkel told fellow leaders that there are “millions of people following us with their concerns, their fears and their needs, who hope that we can make a contribution to solving the problems.”

“We all know the big global challenges, and we know that time is pressing,” she said. “So solutions can only be found if we are prepared to compromise … without, and I say this clearly, bending ourselves too much out of shape. We can of course also name differences.”

The leaders did make a joint statement on fighting terrorism, an issue on which there are few differences. They called for ensuring that there are “no ‘safe spaces’ for terrorist financing anywhere in the world” and pledged to work with internet providers and app administrators to combat the web’s use for terror propaganda and financing.

Merkel noted that the countries at the summit represent two-thirds of the world’s population, four-fifths of the globe’s gross domestic product and three-quarters of world trade.

The G-20 comprises Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, Germany, France, Britain, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Canada, South Korea, Mexico, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Turkey, the United States and the European Union.

Also attending are the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Guinea, Senegal, Singapore and Vietnam.

Merkel said the threat posed by North Korea’s missile tests was brought up at Friday’s meetings by the leaders of South Korea and other countries in the region, and all hoped that “the U.N. Security Council will find an appropriate answer” to Pyongyang’s violation of U.N. resolutions.

The summit was also a forum for a flurry of bilateral meetings, including Trump’s first encounter with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Outside the security cordon around the downtown congress center, anti-globalization activists set dozens of cars ablaze and tried unsuccessfully to block national delegations from entering the summit.

The city already had boosted its police with reinforcements from around the country and had 20,000 officers on hand to patrol Hamburg’s streets, skies and waterways. Another 900 were called in to cope with the clashes.

Merkel thanked them for their work.

“I have every understanding for peaceful demonstrations,” she said. “But violent demonstrations endanger human lives, they endanger people themselves, they put police officers and security forces in danger, put residents in danger, and so that is unacceptable.”

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HAMBURG, Germany (AP) — German Chancellor Angela Merkel told leaders of the Group of 20 economic powers Friday that millions of people are hoping they can help solve the world’s problems, and warned them that they must be prepared to make compromises.

As the leaders discussed terrorism, trade and climate change, protests against their gathering continued in various parts of Hamburg. Anti-globalization activists set dozens of cars ablaze and protesters tried unsuccessfully to block leaders’ delegations from getting to the downtown convention center where the summit is being held.

Police ordered in several hundred more officers from across the country on Friday.

Inside the security cordon, Merkel’s prospects of finding common ground issues such as climate change and multilateral trade looked uncertain at President Donald Trump’s first G-20 summit. Trump’s “America First” rhetoric and decision to withdraw from the Paris accord against climate change have caused widespread concern in Europe and beyond.

“There are of course millions of people following us with their concerns, their fears and their needs, who hope that we can make a contribution to solving the problems,” Merkel told fellow leaders at the start of a working lunch at which they were to discuss global growth and trade.

“I am absolutely sure that everyone will make an effort to achieve good results,” she added.

“We all know the big global challenges, and we know that time is pressing,” Merkel said. “So solutions can only be found if we are prepared to compromise … without, and I say this clearly, bending ourselves too much out of shape. We can of course also name differences.”

Merkel noted that the countries at the summit represent two-thirds of the world population, four-fifths of the globe’s gross domestic product and three-quarters of world trade.

The G-20 comprises Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, Germany, France, Britain, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Canada, South Korea, Mexico, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Turkey, the United States and the European Union.

Also attending the summit are the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Guinea, Senegal, Singapore and Vietnam.

Before the summit, the leaders of China, India, Russia, Brazil and South Africa met and called for a more open global economy.

In a statement following their meeting, the so-called BRICS nations voiced support for a “rules-based, transparent, non-discriminatory, open and inclusive multilateral trading system” and emphasized the need for increasing “the voice and representation” of emerging markets and developing countries in global economic and financial institutions.

Speaking at the meeting, Russian President Vladimir Putin spoke against global trade restrictions, saying that financial sanctions on a political pretext hurt mutual confidence and damage the global economy — an apparent reference to Western sanctions against Russia.

The BRICS leaders also urged the international community to work jointly to implement the Paris climate agreement.

The summit, at which Trump was holding his first meeting with Putin, follows skirmishes Thursday evening between police and protesters at a demonstration in Germany’s second-biggest city that was expected to be the largest flashpoint around the summit.

Police said that at least 111 officers were hurt during those clashes, one of whom had to be taken to a hospital with an eye injury after a firework exploded in front of him. Twenty-nine people were arrested and another 15 temporarily detained.

On Friday, there were further incidents but nothing as intense as Thursday’s skirmishes.

Dozens of officers built moving lines in different parts of Hamburg and used water cannons to force away protesters from streets across the city. Some were physically moved for hundreds of meters (yards) from a protest sit-in in front of the first security checkpoint near the summit grounds.

None of the activists managed to push into the no-go zone around the summit that the police had established.

The city has boosted its police with reinforcements from around the country and has 20,000 officers on hand to patrol Hamburg’s streets, skies and waterways.

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HAMBURG, Germany (AP) — Russia’s President Vladimir Putin is calling for a careful and pragmatic approach in tackling tensions over North Korea.

Speaking Friday at the start of his meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-in on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Hamburg, Putin emphasized the need for a level-headed approach.

He noted that while the problem linked with Pyongyang’s nuclear and missile programs is “very acute,” it’s “important not to lose self-control and act in a pragmatic, very accurate way.”

The South Korean president emphasized that “the North Korean missile provocation has become a threat to the entire region.”

Moon added that he was pinning great hopes on Putin to persuade Pyongyang to enter a dialogue.

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HAMBURG, Germany (AP) — Anti-globalization activists set dozens of cars ablaze and tried to block national delegations from entering the Group of 20 summit Friday as the meeting got underway in the German port city of Hamburg. Responding to a second day of protests, police ordered in several hundred more officers from across the country.

Hundreds of officers built moving lines in different parts of Hamburg and used water cannons to force away protesters from streets across the city. Some were physically moved for hundreds of meters (yards) from a protest sit-in in front of the first security checkpoint near the summit grounds.

Police later tweeted that all the world leaders attending the summit made it safely to the city’s convention center, where the event is taking place. None of the activists who took to the streets to protest globalization, economic inequality and what they see as inaction on climate change managed to push into the no-go zone police established around the gathering.

The leaders, including host German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Donald Trump, Russian President Vladimir Putin and many others, were to discuss issues such as fighting international terrorism, but also to tackle more contentious topics such as climate change and international trade.

Early Friday, activists shot firecrackers at a police helicopter and only narrowly missed it, police said. Windows at the Mongolian consulate were also broken and the tires of a car belonging to the Canadian delegation were punctured.

Skirmishes and small clashes took place across the city as protesters roamed around. Later in the day, masked demonstrators put up barricades in the city’s Altona neighborhood and threw gasoline bombs at police.

Anti-globalization protesters also kept U.S. first lady Melania Trump from joining the spouses of the other world leaders at the summit.

The first lady’s spokeswoman, Stephanie Grisham, said that because of the demonstrators, Hamburg police had not cleared Melania Trump to leave the government guest house where she and the president spent the night. Hamburg police did not confirm the account.

The first lady tweeted that she was thinking of those who were hurt during protests that began Thursday.

“Hope everyone stay safe!” she wrote.

Hamburg police, who already have 20,000 officers on hand to patrol the city’s streets, skies and waterways, demanded reinforcement from police around the country.

“We’ve asked for a few hundreds more police officers — they’re on the way,” Andy Grote, the city’s interior senator, told reporters. “The potential for criminal energy and violence of some is shocking.”

Grote said that some activists were directly attacking officers and that 45 protesters were detained and another 15 were temporarily taken into custody. So far, 160 police officers were hurt, most of them slightly, but some also had to be taken to the hospital — one of whom had an eye injury after a firework exploded in front of him.

Hamburg police also posted a photo on Twitter showing the bloody wound of a police officer they said was injured by slingshot catapults.

Kathleen Mueller, a 56-year-old protester from Potsdam near Berlin, criticized police for what she said were “brutal responses” to overwhelmingly peaceful demonstrations.

Mueller said she’d come to Hamburg to stop rampant consumerism and to tell leaders that “we need to … rethink our economic systems.” She said she saw riot police wrenching apart a peaceful human chain and dragging people off.

“They didn’t have to do that, there was no resistance, it was just to cause pain and it shouldn’t happen,” said Mueller, who was participating in a protest of some 300 people in a park near the summit grounds.

Hamburg resident Kursat Bayazit, 42, expressing frustrations with both the summit and the demonstrations keeping him from getting to his work as a landscaper.

“Yesterday, there were big problems,” Bayazit said while taking a stroll with his 2-year-old daughter in the St. Pauli neighborhood that had seen heavy clashes Thursday night.

He pointed across the street to a large, burned-out garbage can with an empty fire extinguisher lying nearby and the pungent smell of smoke still in the air.

“They burned that garbage can and in other places cars, it really scared my daughter,” Bayazit said, expressing frustrations with both the summit and the demonstrations because they kept him from getting to work.

However, not all St. Pauli residents seemed to share Bayazit’s frustration regarding the chaos overtaking their city during the G-20 summit.

Few had their stores and homes boarded up and some residents seemed to be welcoming the protesters. Some were sitting in coffee shops, three young men were listening to Reggae music on their balcony and wearing anti-summit T-shirts while a few buildings further down the street, a banner hung from a window saying “granny and grandpa are against G-20” and “G-20 – go get beer.”

Some bars had put up signs saying, “protesters welcome” and late Thursday, prostitutes on the city’s famous Reeperbahn amusement strip could be seen dancing to the music of the activists and giving a thumbs-up to those passing by.

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PARIS (AP) — A French investigation into a Las Vegas tech party is putting new pressure on President Emmanuel Macron’s labor minister — and possibly the president himself — as they pursue difficult reforms to French work rules.

The Paris prosecutor’s office opened a formal judicial inquiry Friday into suspected irregularities in the organization of a costly, high-profile event at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show that Macron headlined when he was a French government minister.

The inquiry is for “favoritism,” but it doesn’t name a suspected perpetrator yet, leaving it to investigators to determine later who might be at fault.

The company tasked with organizing the “French Tech Night” event, advertising firm Havas, is believed to have won the contract without undergoing open tender procedures, among other suspected problems.

It’s unclear whether Macron himself was aware and the investigation doesn’t target him directly. It is problematic, however, for his labor minister, Muriel Penicaud.

Penicaud was working for an agency under the economy ministry — then headed by Macron — that reportedly signed off on the Havas contract.

Penicaud has acknowledged a “procedural error” in the process but says she then launched an internal and external audit and addressed the issue. She and Havas didn’t immediately comment Friday on the judicial inquiry.

Macron used the trip to promote French technology startups, a pillar of his strategy for boosting the French economy.

Another pillar is the labor law that Penicaud is spearheading this summer, which would make it easier to hire and fire workers and reduce the power of unions.

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HAMBURG, Germany (AP) — German police say organizers of a protest against the Group of 20 summit have declared the march over after trouble broke out at the start of the demonstration in the northern city of Hamburg.

Officers used water cannons and pepper spray to disperse black-hooded protesters at the event dubbed “G-20: Welcome to Hell.” Police say the masked protesters attacked them with bottles, stones and other objects and set fires in the street.

More than 100,000 protesters are expected in the city for the summit that takes place Friday and Saturday. Hamburg has boosted its forces so that 20,000 officers are on hand to patrol its streets, skies and waterways.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin are among those attending the summit hosted by German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

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DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Qatar Airways joined two other major long-haul Gulf carriers on Thursday in getting off a U.S. ban on laptops and large electronics in airplane cabins, despite facing logistical challenges amid the country’s diplomatic dispute with several Arab nations.

Doha-based Qatar Airways, Abu Dhabi-based Etihad, Dubai-based Emirates and Istanbul-based Turkish Airlines all have put security procedures in place to satisfy American authorities. U.S. officials instituted the ban in March across 10 Middle East cities over concerns Islamic State fighters and other extremists could hide bombs inside of laptops.

Qatar Airways said that with “immediate effect, all personal electronic devices can be carried on board all departures from Hamad International Airport to destinations in the United States.” Hamad in Doha is the hub of Qatar Airways.

“Safety and security are always our highest priority,” Qatar Airways CEO Akbar al-Baker said in a statement. “They are expressed throughout all of our corporate values and must never be compromised.”

The airline did not respond to questions about its new procedures. Michael England, a spokesman for the U.S. Transportation Security Administration, said Qatar Airways had been removed from the ban list, but declined to elaborate on what it did to satisfy American concerns.

The U.S. laptop ban still applies to nonstop U.S.-bound flights from six airports in Amman, Jordan; Kuwait City; Cairo; Jeddah and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; and Casablanca, Morocco. Saudi Arabian Airlines has said it hopes to be off the ban list “on or before July 19.”

While Gulf airlines have not commented on security procedures, Turkish officials say they use CT scanners to take cross-section images of electronics just before passengers board airplanes heading to the U.S. Istanbul airport now also restricts U.S.-bound flights to two departure gates, apparently for better security.

Etihad, the flag carrier of the United Arab Emirates, already has a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility at its Abu Dhabi hub that allows passengers to clear screening they’d otherwise have to go through when landing in America.

There is a precedent for concern over laptops being used as bombs. Somalia’s al-Qaida-linked al-Shabaab said it planted a bomb inside a laptop-like device that exploded on a plane leaving Mogadishu in February 2016, killing only the bomber.

However, the security concerns also come amid a wider dispute between Gulf airlines and American carriers, which accuse the Middle East airlines of flooding the market with flights while receiving billions of dollars of unfair government subsidies. The Gulf carriers all vigorously deny that.

The laptop ban, coupled with the Trump administration’s travel ban on six predominantly Muslim countries, has hurt Middle Eastern airlines. Emirates, the region’s biggest, said it slashed 20 percent of its flights to America in the wake of the restrictions.

Meanwhile, Qatar Airways has seen its flight paths over many of its neighbors cut off since Bahrain, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the UAE cut diplomatic ties to Qatar on June 5. The airline has since been putting more flights over Iranian and Turkish airspace while appealing to a United Nations agency overseeing air travel to reopen those routes. Qatar Airways also has announced it wants to buy 10 percent of American Airlines, which would cost about $2.4 billion and possibly further open the U.S. market to the carrier.

Qatar’s foreign minister on Wednesday said he didn’t believe Qatar Airway’s delay in getting off the laptop ban list had anything to do with the dispute.

“This is an ongoing process and I think irrelevant to the entire” political crisis, Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani said in London.

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SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korean jets and navy ships fired a barrage of guided-missiles into the ocean during drills Thursday, a display of military power two days after North Korea test-launched its first intercontinental ballistic missile.

The North’s ICBM launch, its most successful missile test to date, has stoked security worries in Washington, Seoul and Tokyo as it showed the country could eventually perfect a reliable nuclear missile capable of reaching anywhere in the United States. Analysts say the missile tested Tuesday could reach Alaska if launched at a normal trajectory.

The live-fire drills off South Korea’s east coast were previously scheduled. In a show of force, South Korea and the United States also staged “deep strike” precision missile firing drills on Wednesday as a warning to the North.

In North Korea’s capital, thousands of people rallied Thursday in Kim Il Sung square to celebrate the launch.

The rally was followed by a fireworks display along the Taedonggang, a river that runs through central Pyongyang.

North Korea often stages rallies in the square to mark events that it wants to underscore as particularly significant. A similar rally was held last month on the anniversary of the beginning of the 1950-53 Korean War.

Thursday’s drills in South Korea were aimed at boosting readiness against possible maritime North Korean aggression. They involved 15 warships including a 3,200-ton-class destroyer, as well as helicopters and fighter jets, South Korea’s navy said in a statement.

“Our military is maintaining the highest level of readiness to make a swift response even if a war breaks out today,” said Rear Adm. Kwon Jeong Seob, who directed the drills, according to the statement.

After the ICBM launch, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said he would never put his weapons programs up for negotiation unless the United States abandons its hostile policy toward the North. Kim’s statement suggested he will order more missile and nuclear tests until his country develops a functioning ICBM that can place the entire U.S. within its striking distance.

In a U.N. Security Council session Wednesday, U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley said the launch “is a clear and sharp military escalation” and the United States is prepared to use its “considerable military forces” to defend itself and its allies “if we must.” She said the U.S. administration prefers “not to go in that direction,” but to use its “great capabilities in the area of trade” to address “those who threaten us and … those who supply the threats.”

Speaking in Berlin before the Group of 20 summit, South Korean President Moon Jae-in said Wednesday that the world should look at tougher sanctions against the North and insisted the problem must be solved peacefully.

The missile launch was a direct rebuke to U.S. President Donald Trump’s earlier declaration on Twitter that such a test “won’t happen!” and to Moon, who was pushing to improve strained ties with the North.

The U.N. Security Council could impose additional sanctions on North Korea, but it’s not clear they would stop it from pursuing its nuclear and missile programs since the country is already under multiple rounds of U.N. sanctions for its previous weapon tests.

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SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — U.N. diplomats say Russia has blocked U.N. Security Council approval of a statement that would strongly condemn North Korea’s launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile and renew a pledge to take “further significant measures.”

The diplomats, speaking on condition of anonymity because discussions have been private, said North Korea’s closest ally, China, had agreed to the text. They said discussions were continuing Thursday to try to find wording that all 15 council members would approve.

According to one diplomat, Russia objected because the proposed statement said the launch was of an intercontinental ballistic missile.

Russia’s deputy U.N. ambassador, Vladimir Safronkov, told an emergency Security Council meeting on Wednesday that the launch “requires thorough clarification and investigation” and indicated it might have been a medium-range missile.

U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley retorted that U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, the United States and North Korea said it was an ICBM. She said if Russia needs intelligence to prove it, “I’m happy to provide it.”

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