Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX) produced a chart for the ages at an oversight hearing of the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, in an attempt to convince Attorney General Jeff Sessions that the Justice Department ought to appoint a special prosecutor to probe the so-called “Uranium One” scandal.

“We’ve got a chart here that shows just how integral the relationship is with Mr. Rosenstein, Mr. Mueller, into this whole Uranium One thing,” Gohmert told Sessions, waving a piece of paper with the chart printed on it while his staff held up a larger version on poster board behind him.

The White House and Republicans have pushed the Uranium One narrative in response to increased scrutiny on President Trump and 2016 election meddling.

“It sure stinks to high heaven, and it doesn’t appear to me they ought to be involved in investigating,” Gohmert said.

Watch below via Gohmert’s office:

H/t Chris Geidner.

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The number of anti-Semitic incidents reported in the U.S. has increased by 67 percent from 2016 to 2017, according to an Anti-Defamation League (ADL) audit released Thursday.

Some 1,299 incidents of physical assaults, vandalism, and defacement of Jewish institutions occurred between Jan. 1 and Sept. 30 of this year, compared to 779 over the same period last year, with a notable spike after August’s violent white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The audit also found a notable increase in anti-Semitic bullying and vandalism in schools. Incidents in K-12 grade schools during the period covered by the review more than doubled from 130 to 269, while those on college campuses went from 74 to 118.

In Healdsburg, California, for example, a sixth-grade Jewish boy was taunted with swastikas and cigarette lighters and told by classmates that they would burn him “like they did in the Holocaust.”

Other examples cited by the ADL include a Fairfax, Virginia Jewish Community Center being defaced with the SS symbol and words “Hitler was right,” and an Orthodox Jewish woman in Brooklyn being called a “fucking Jew” by an assailant who pulled her wig off.

“We are astonished and horrified by the rise in anti-Semitic harassment, incidents and violence targeting our communities,” ADL CEO Jonathan A. Greenblatt said in a statement. “While the tragedy in Charlottesville highlighted this trend, it was not an aberration. Every single day, white supremacists target members of the Jewish community—holding rallies in public, recruiting on college campuses, attacking journalists on social media, and even targeting young children.”

The ADL’s data is drawn from victims, law enforcement, and community leaders, and includes both criminal and non-criminal acts.

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The Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, a progressive think tank, on Monday released an analysis of the effects of Senate Republicans’ Obamacare repeal bill on health care premiums.

In short: They’ll go up, and especially so for older people.

The above chart tracks the increase in premium price for “silver plan” insurance coverage for a hypothetical 60-year-old with income at 350 percent of the poverty line in 2020.

The below chart tracks the decrease in premium tax credits for the the same hypothetical individual, except now the individual has an income slightly above 350 percent of the poverty line, so that they would not receive any federal tax credit to purchase insurance on the individual market.

CBPP took into account the Senate Republican bill’s cuts to tax credits for individuals purchasing insurance; the bill’s re-arrangement of the tax credit schedule, which would disfavor older people; the bill’s elimination of tax credits for individuals between 350 and 400 percent of the poverty line; and the bill’s stipulation that insurers would now be allowed to charge older people up to five times more than young people, as opposed to three times more under Obamacare. The bill would also eliminate Obamacare’s cost-sharing reductions, insurer subsidies to help low-income individuals afford care.

Read CBPP’s full report here.

This post has been updated.

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An analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation of the leading Republican plan to repeal and replace Obamacare shows that the GOP-proposed tax credits will become even more meager when compared to the Affordable Care Act over time.

The analysis predicts that under the GOP bill, titled the American Health Care Act, the tax credits the average individual would receive will be 41 percent lower than what they would had gotten under Obamacare in 2022 and 44 percent lower in 2027. The trend is driven by the metric the Republican proposal uses to increase the credits: inflation plus one percentage point. Health care costs tend to rise faster than inflation, and faster than inflation plus one percentage point.

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An analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation published Wednesday of a GOP proposal to rework the Affordable Care Acts subsidies into tax credits available to everyone illustrates how the plan, which was leaked last week, would represent a major loss for lower-income people and older Americans. Those higher on the income scale stand to gain under such a plan.

Republican leadership is considering offering refundable tax credits that start at $2,000 annual for individuals under 30 and raise with age, up to $4,000 for those over 60. Unlike the ACA's tax credits, they do not adjust with income, meaning a wealthy person would be getting the same break as a low income American. Obamacare's tax credits end for people making 400 percent of the federal poverty line.

The rate at which the Republican tax credits grow by age is slower that those offered under Obamacare, meaning older people will be bearing a greater burden of their premiums under the GOP plan. Currently, under the ACA, older people can face premiums three times higher than younger people, and Republicans' credits only double in size for those at the oldest end. GOP lawmakers have also proposed expanding the ratio for premiums for young and old people to one to five, which could further exacerbate the hit older people would take under the Republican plan.

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A report released Tuesday by the left-leaning think tank Center on Budget and Policy Priorities breaks down how Republicans, if they follow the 2015 model of repealing the Affordable Care Act, would spend two-thirds of the money saved by repealing Obamacare's benefits to pay for tax cuts, directed mostly at high-earners.

According to the report, the failed 2015 legislation that congressional leaders have since signaled will be their rubric going forward would produce about $1 trillion in savings over the next decade by dismantling the Medicaid expansion and subsidies for the individual exchanges while also repealing the mandates. However, repealing the taxes that raised revenue for Obamacare -- including the taxes for high earners as well as those on the health care industry -- would cost the government $670 billion in the next decade, leaving about $317 billion left over in savings that lawmakers could use on a hypothetical replacement.

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A new analysis by the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center breaks down who would benefit most and least from the tax cuts that would come with Obamacare repeal, assuming Republicans follow the model of their 2015 repeal legislation. It found that those in the top quintile would see their after-tax income rise by 0.8 percent due to the various cuts in the law, while those on the lower end of the earning scale would see their after-tax income decrease, mainly because of the loss of the law's tax credits to subsidize buying insurance.

As the TPC explains, the multiple moving parts of an Obamacare repeal affect taxpayers in different ways and the variation is wide even within each income group. The ACA tax credits play a major role in determining the losers, but even if they are excluded from consideration, those on the bottom and the middle benefit from the tax cuts far less than those on the top.

For instance, a vast majority (94 percent) of middle-income households (making between $52,000 and $89,000) do see a small tax cut that averages around $110, but three percent of middle-income earners would see a massive tax hike, averaging $6,200, because of the elimination of the tax credits for insurance plans purchased through the individual exchanges.

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