P2vnjvupjgazdwptr1ik

Tierney Sneed

Tierney Sneed is a reporter for Talking Points Memo. She previously worked for U.S. News and World Report. She grew up in Florida and attended Georgetown University.

Articles by

The leading opponents of same-sex marriage have been attempting to re-write recent American history, where decades of sneering public attacks on gays and lesbians, condemnations of their "lifestyle," and blaming them for a decline of America's moral virtue are quietly forgotten.

Their argument, made in front of the Supreme Court, no less, is that gay marriage bans are not motivated by prejudice toward gays and lesbians, but by a more noble if newfound purpose. In the days to come, the justices will reveal whether they subscribe to this new version of history in a decision that could decide whether gay couples have the right to marry nationwide.

Read More →

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg isn't just Internet famous: the liberal justice is America's most popular Supreme Court judge, a new poll finds.

The findings were part of larger national survey done by the liberal-leaning polling organization, Public Policy Polling. In the poll, participants were asked how they viewed each of the justices individually, favorably or unfavorably. They were also asked to pick their favorite and least favorite among the nine justices.

Ginsburg ranked first among the justices in the "favorite" category. When asked who was their least favorite Supreme Court judge, more Americans said Justice Clarence Thomas, the oft-silent conservative, than any other justice.

Read More →

Trouble from a trip Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) took to Europe earlier this year has chased him back over to this side of the Atlantic, despite his best efforts. The 2016 contender is dodging questions about a story he recently told in which British Prime Minister David Cameron criticized Present Obama when Walker met with the PM in February -- a story the prime minister's office is now disputing.

"I'm just not going to comment on individual meetings I had with leaders like that, be it there or anyone else," Walker said, according to the Journal Sentinel, while on a press call regarding his current trip to Canada. "That's something I'm not going to do going forward."

Read More →

Republican congressional leaders claim they are having a tough time cobbling together a back-up plan in case the Supreme Court invalidates Obamacare subsidies for millions of Americans thanks in no small part to the presidential aspirations among some in their flock.

“Corralling our presidentials on a plan or a solution is going to be a bit of a challenge,” Sen. John Thune (R-SD), the GOP's No. 3 in the Senate, told Politico. “Everyone is going to be running away from — lock, stock and barrel — any connection whatsoever to the current program.”

Read More →

Ahead of a potentially historic Supreme Court ruling, leading Republicans are vowing to defy any decision that sanctions same-sex marriage and are challenging the very legitimacy of the high court.

With a decision in Obergefell v. Hodges expected before the end of June, conservatives are confronted with what was only a few years ago a nearly unthinkable possibility: a Supreme Court decision that decisively makes same-sex marriage a constitutional right.

Read More →

About three-quarters of Republican state lawmakers who signed Grover Norquist’s notorious anti-tax pledge broke their promise not to raise taxes by approving a budget that will raise $384 million in tax revenue.

According to the tally of The Hutchinson News, only six of the state’s 53 lawmakers who have signed either Norquist’s Americans for Tax Reform pledge, or the Koch brothers-affiliated Americans for Prosperity pledge, voted against the recently-passed package. Fifteen of the 21 ATR-pledge signers approved of the Senate budget deal or its House version, which the group confirmed to TPM does not meet the standards of their anti-tax promise. Gov. Sam Brownback (R), who is expected to sign legislation, is not among the ATR pledge-signers.

Read More →

If Californians would like to see an end to the extreme drought the state is facing, they should consider passing more restrictions on abortion. That, at least, was the suggestion of a California assemblywomen in remarks to anti-abortion activists last week.

"Texas was in a long period of drought until Governor Perry signed the fetal pain bill,” state Assemblywoman Shannon Grove (R-Bakersfield) said, as reported by RH Reality Check. "It rained that night. Now God has His hold on California."

Read More →

If Mitt Romney holds any grudge against Sheldon Adelson for funding the GOP rivals who roiled his 2012 GOP presidential primary campaign, he isn’t showing it.

The failed GOP nominee and the Las Vegas casino magnate are teaming up to see that the 2016 presidential race is not a repeat of the 2012 campaign for Republicans. Politico reports that Romney and Adelson have joined forces to convince donors to rally behind the conservative White House contenders with broad appeal and stymie the sort of long-shot candidacies that wrought havoc in 2012.

Read More →

State lawmakers are struggling to come up with a contingency plan if the Supreme Court invalidates their federal Obamacare subsidies, according to a Washington Post op-ed by policy experts.

“Dozens of interviews conducted by our research team with political leaders, agency officials and advocacy organizations in those states indicate that the states are almost completely underprepared for the Supreme Court’s decision in [King v. Burwell],” wrote David K. Jones, an assistant professor at the Boston University School of Public Health, and Nicholas Bagley, an assistant professor of law at the University of Michigan.

Read More →

LiveWire