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Tierney Sneed

Tierney Sneed is a reporter for Talking Points Memo. She previously worked for U.S. News and World Report. She grew up in Florida and attended Georgetown University.

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The weeks-long occupation of a federal wildlife refuge in rural Oregon by anti-government extremists could have ended in a variety of ways -- the most worrisome of which is the way of Waco or Ruby Ridge: violently. But Thursday the FBI was able to convince the remaining four occupiers to leave the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge voluntarily, a conclusion that one expert on anti-government extremism praised as a "nonviolent coda" that reduces the likelihood that sympathizers will seek retribution.

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Cliven Bundy -- the Nevada rancher behind a 2014 showdown with federal authorities and father of two leaders arrested in the Oregon standoff -- has been accused of six violations of federal law, including conspiracy to commit an offense against the United States and assault of a federal law enforcement officer.

Bundy was arrested late Wednesday evening in Portland, Oregon. The allegations contained in the criminal complaint filed in Nevada are focused on the 2014 showdown at his Bundy Ranch. None of the charges pertain to the Oregon refuge standoff that his sons were involved in.

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An Iranian official said "Republican rivals of the current US administration" attempted to stall last month's Iranian-U.S. prisoner swap until the eve of the U.S. presidential election, Tasnim News Agency reported.

According to the semi-official Iranian news outlet, Ali Shamkhani, the secretary of Iran’s Supreme National Security Council, made the claims during a speech Thursday at a rally in Yazd, Iran.

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The Supreme Court’s decision to block President Obama’s climate change plan sent shockwaves through the legal community, environmental activists and even the industries that oppose these environmental regulations.

The order was surprising not just because it was a rebuke to a major priority of Obama’s administration. It also was at odds the Supreme Court’s usual practice in choosing when to halt a major regulation from moving forward. All four liberal justices expressed their disagreement with injunction.

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Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) thanked his supporters for helping him take on "the most powerful political organization in the United States of America" in his victory speech Tuesday after defeating Hillary Clinton in the New Hampshire primary.

"What began last week in Iowa and voters here in New Hampshire confirmed tonight is nothing short of the beginning of a political revolution," Sanders declared.

"Together we have sent the message that will echo from Wall Street to Washington, Maine to California, and that is that the government of our great country to belongs to all of the people and not just a handful of wealth campaign contributors and their super PACS," Sanders said, noting he started his campaign in New Hampshire nine months with no money and no organization.

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Moments after the New Hampshire Democratic primary was called for Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) by the major networks, Hillary Clinton's campaign blasted out a three-page memo penned by campaign manager Robby Mook stressing the importance of the primaries that come after the first four in February.

"The reason is simple: while important, the first four states represent just 4% of the delegates needed to secure the nomination; the 28 states that vote (or caucus) in March will award 56% of the delegates needed to win," the memo said.

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Researchers at UC-San Diego are working on a study on how voter ID laws affect turnout rates, and a working paper they released detailing the results thus far seems to confirm what the laws’ critics have often said.

Voter ID laws adversely affected the turnout of minorities, and particularly that of Latinos, the paper found. The study also revealed that turnout among Democrats was disproportionately affected, backing up claims of a political motivation behind the laws, which have been overwhelmingly championed by GOP legislators.

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Virginia's State Board of Elections is asking the court weighing a voting rights case being brought in the state to exclude any evidence of the state's history of racial discrimination.

The board filed a motion Monday to "exclude expert testimony and other evidence of Virginia’s history of racial discrimination," particularly anything that happened before 1965, when the federal Voting Rights Act was passed.

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