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David Taintor

David Taintor is a news editor at Talking Points Memo. Previously, he worked at NBC News and Adweek. He's a native of Minnesota. Reach him at taintor@talkingpointsmemo.com.

Articles by David

National Republican Senatorial Committee Executive Director Rob Collins released the following statement on news that Sen. Max Baucus (D-MT) will not seek re-election in 2014:

“Just days after calling ObamaCare a 'train wreck,' its architect Max Baucus waved the white flag rather than face voters. ObamaCare has gone from being an ‘abstract’ discussion to a real life pain for workers and families, which has Democratic candidates like Bruce Braley, Mark Pryor, Mark Begich and Kay Hagan backpedaling. Vulnerable Democrats will face voters just as ObamaCare's tax hikes, mandates, fees, penalties, and red tape bureaucracy take shape over the next eight months, and Senator Baucus' retirement reflects that political reality. The 2014 electoral map is in free–fall for Democrats, who were already facing a daunting challenge."

President Obama is scheduled to deliver the keynote address on April 25 at Planned Parenthood's annual gala dinner, the organization announced Tuesday. Planned Parenthood Federation of America Cecile Richards said in a written statement, "President Obama has done more than any president in history for women’s health and rights."

The event will honor Ruth K. Westheimer, "Girls" creator Lena Dunham and Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.

Read the full release here

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Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said on Tuesday at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on immigration reform that the U.S. will learn lessons from the Boston Marathon bombings and apply those lessons to prevent future attacks. 

"We will learn lessons from this attack, just as we have from past instances of terrorism and violent extremism" Napolitano said. "We will apply those; we will emerge even stronger. In this case, law enforcement at all levels joined together and shared knowledge, expertise and resources. Many had been specifically trained in improvised explosive device threats, and many had exercised for this very type of scenario. The response was swift, effective and, in many ways, will serve as a model for the future. I think the people of Boston and the greater Boston area showed tremendous resilience over the past week, and so did America."

A 15-year-old boy identified as Conelius German was found shot dead Monday night near President Obama's Chicago home, the Chicago Sun-Times reported early Tuesday. 

Police said the boy was affiliated with a gang, according to the report. First lady Michelle Obama recently spoke about gun violence in Chicago, recalling the shooting death of Hadiya Pendleton, a teenager who performed in Obama's second inauguration ceremony and was later shot and killed in Chicago.

President Obama on Monday spoke to FBI Special Agent Richard Deslauriers and Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis, thanking them and other officials for their work investigating the Boston Marathon bombings, according to a readout of the President's calls released by the White House. 

Below is the full statement from the White House:

Today, the President placed calls to FBI Special Agent in Charge Richard Deslauriers and Boston Police Commissioner Edward F. Davis to express his appreciation to the men and women of the Boston Field Office, Boston Police Department, and all the members of the Joint Terrorism Task Force. The President hailed the professionalism and bravery demonstrated by officers since Monday, and praised the impressive coordination between these federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies who together were able to bring this chapter of this tragedy to a close. While the President acknowledged there is still much work ahead, he thanked Special Agent in Charge Deslauriers and Commissioner Davis for their leadership and told them that the law enforcement officials, the citizens of Boston, and all affected by this tragedy were in his thoughts and prayers.

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After first reporting that a suspect in the investigation of the deadly Boston Marathon bombing had been arrested, and then walking back that report, CNN has explained the evolution in a statement to TPM:

“CNN had three credible sources on both local and federal levels. Based on this information we reported our findings.  As soon as our sources came to us with new information we adjusted our reporting.”

CNN issued a correction on its Facebook page, but it was not clear whether a correction was posted anywhere on the network's website. 

HuffPost's Michael Calderone was first to report CNN's statement.

Watch a video of CNN's reporting over the course of the story:

 

This post has been updated.

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Following statements from the Boston Police Department and U.S. Attorney's office, the FBI said on Wednesday that no arrest has been made in the investigation of the Boston Marathon bombings: 

Contrary to widespread reporting, no arrest has been made in connection with the Boston Marathon attack. Over the past day and a half, there have been a number of press reports based on information from unofficial sources that has been inaccurate. Since these stories often have unintended consequences, we ask the media, particularly at this early stage of the investigation, to exercise caution and attempt to verify information through appropriate official channels before reporting.

There were conflicting reports Wednesday afternoon about whether officials had made an arrest in the investigation of the deadly Boston Marathon bombings. 

CNN was first to report that an arrest had been made, citing anonymous law enforcement sources. NBC News then cut in with a report saying that no arrest has been made.

Boston TV station WCVB reported that an arrest "is imminent or may have already taken place." Meanwhile, the Associated Press reported that a suspect was in custody and expected to be brought to federal court. 

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